learnding disabilities
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By: LD Resources Foundation Action

Often Learning disabled students suffer from low self-esteem and an impaired sense of self-worth. If you have LD  or ADHD, or both, you may mistakenly feel that you are less intelligent than your peers.  It is important to help such children recognize both their areas of difficulty and their areas of strength.

About 40 percent of those afflicted with ADHD have a learning disability in addition to their ADHD. Some have Dyslexia. And some adults who have ADHD suffer from more than one additional learning disability.

These are conditions which make learning itself difficult, causing significant impairments to reading, writing and performing calculations, as well as creating problems in visual or auditory perception and memory.

Because of these formidable obstacles to learning, children and adults with such disabilities are likely to be hyper-self critical and evaluate themselves as ‘stupid’ or ‘slow’  based upon academic comparisons with their children or adults peers.

Interested readers can follow the links included below to articles which offer helpful ways to address the topic of low self esteem among learning disabled children and adults.